Stewardship

The Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct work to maintain the beauty of the undeveloped trail and the integrity of the entire length of the tunnel from Croton into New York City. We are always looking for volunteers interested in getting involved with adopting a part of the trail for invasive management. We also have an annual cleanup of the trail in Yonkers.

INVASIVE PLANT MANAGEMENT HISTORIC WALL RESTORATIONNATIVE PLANT RESTORATION

Related Blog Entries

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 19-003

Author: 
DAlden

July 21-22, September 24-28 2018

Invasive vines
Author: 
FOCAAdmin

On July 15 the Friends participated in New York State’s Invasive Species Awareness Week by hosting a workshop on Invasive Species at the Keeper’s House.   Workshop leaders Diane Alden and Daria Gregg have participated in surveying the entire Westchester section of the Aqueduct trail, are Wildflower Guides at Teatown and have adopted sections of the Aqueduct near their homes where they have been working for many years to control invasive plants and to do restoration planting with native species.  Diane is an amateur naturalist and Daria is a Citizen Scientist at the NY Botanic

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Have you have ever asked “where does the trail go now?"

Here’s good news.

The Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct commissioned these five informative, helpful signs to be put in places that have had walkers mystified.  Places like the exit from Lyndhurst – smack on to Route 9 in Tarrytown, that has had walkers asking, “ Now what?" 

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

The Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct (FOCA) congratulate the volunteers for their hard work, energy, enthusiasm and spirit of collaboration. There were one hundred and five people who showed up to help for the seventh annual I Love My Park Day on May 5, 2018! An extra special thanks to those who volunteered more than once and a very warm welcome to those who participated for the first time.


Photo credit: John and Lynn Salmon

Author: 
CFahn

State crews under the direction of trail manager Steve Oakes did a wonderful job this summer re-creating the Aqueduct trail in the short but important section between Lamartine Ave. and Bishop William J. Walls Place in Yonkers. It looks like it's always been there. It takes literally 3 minutes to walk the segment.

I recently went to see it; it's 15 minutes or less driving time straight south on Warburton Ave. from Hastings; then turn left onto Lamartine and park on that block. The segment is best seen now or soon, while the trees are still fully leafed out.

Author: 
DAlden

July success! Over 20,000 invasive plants removed; numerous native trees, bushes and plants saved!

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

caption: Group Photo by Karena Gray

For the full photo album, click HERE

 

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Rid the trail of invasive plants and
Restore Historic Stone Walls
with the Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct

Register in advance at http://www.ptny.org/ilovemypark
 

Where: On the trail along Quaker Bridge Road, Croton on Hudson (look for a white canopy)

Parking: On street — look for designated volunteer signs between houses #124 and #99

Perks: Water, coffee, snacks, gloves, tee shirts, tools & bug stuff provided

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Despite the damp weather, an enthusiastic crowd turned out for the annual Yonkers trail cleanup. Checkout our excellent photo album on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/FriendsoftheOldCrotonAqueduct/

 

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