Stewardship

The Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct work to maintain the beauty of the undeveloped trail and the integrity of the entire length of the tunnel from Croton into New York City. We are always looking for volunteers interested in getting involved with adopting a part of the trail for invasive management. We also have an annual cleanup of the trail in Yonkers.

INVASIVE PLANT MANAGEMENT HISTORIC WALL RESTORATIONNATIVE PLANT RESTORATION

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Author: 
DAlden
Author: 
DAlden

Work accomplished 3.18.22

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Author: 
DAlden
Author: 
DAlden

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The long awaited stone wall restoration has begun on the Ossining section of the OCA! 

Author: 
DAlden

The problem: Stilt grass is ubiquitous on the Aqueduct trail and in mid-September is currently flowering and will shortly start to set the seeds which will widely disperse onto the trail.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Excerpt from The Rivertowns Enterprise. Readers can access the full story starting on page 5 of the Rivertowns Enterprise e-digital version from their August 13th edition.  They can open a free e-edition account to view the article at Rivertowns Enterprise e-edtion.

By Kris DiLorenzo

Author: 
DAlden

 

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

It was a fashion-forward I Love My Parks Day in North Yonkers. Thirty "models" recently converged on a scenic runway, the Old Croton Aqueduct Trail, for the annual spring show of voguish volunteers, assisted by a hardworking Yonkers crew from the Dept of Public Works.

While "modelling" their best Covid tees and work sweats in a versatile Spring collection, some volunteers handily eradicated nonnative plants and trash. Uprooting over 150 pounds of wild chervil and garlic mustard was easy in new 2021 Special Edition gear!

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

A group of wonderful students from Mercy College  created their own pop-up I Love My Parks Day on May 1st to clean up the trail between Cedar Street in Dobbs Ferry and the Mercy Campus.

Way to go guys and thank you!

Author: 
LWalter

… . Smack in the midst of 200,00 people, on Yonker’s hidden gem!

In late March, arborist Guy Pardee of Suburban Native LLC took up combat along a section of North Yonkers Aqueduct Trail. Guy chops vines for a living - freeing trees, rock walls and scenic views in the process. That’s when he discovered the wildlife. Besides an owl pellet filled with mouse bones, and an osprey, he found a gulch filled with feral cats and large deer families living in backyards.

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