Stewardship

The Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct work to maintain the beauty of the undeveloped trail and the integrity of the entire length of the tunnel from Croton into New York City. We are always looking for volunteers interested in getting involved with adopting a part of the trail for invasive management. We also have an annual cleanup of the trail in Yonkers.

INVASIVE PLANT MANAGEMENT HISTORIC WALL RESTORATIONNATIVE PLANT RESTORATION

Related Blog Entries

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

As promised, I recruited individual families to continue the work of removing Garlic mustard from the trail. Two parents and their two little girls enjoyed clambering along the hillsides of the trail pulling Garlic mustard and bagging it for disposal. This family had participated in the 2019 I Love My Park Day and were pleased to have the opportunity to continue the work the following May.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

(photo by Pilar Maschi)

Volunteers from the Friends of Aqueduct Walk and the University Heights community, led by Pilar Maschi, Partnership for Parks Catalyst facilitator, demonstrated their hard work and love for the Aqueduct trail by holding a clean-up event on Saturday, November 8. An article in the Norwood News' November 27 issue noted that the volunteers also planted crocuses. Aqueduct Walk, a New York City park, lies between Fordham Road and 183rd St. in The Bronx.

Congratulations from Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct!

 

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

The Mercy campus is right on the trail in Dobbs Ferry, but on a Saturday in November a group of students went further afield to parts of the Aqueduct where they don’t usually walk.

They assembled at a neglected section of the Aqueduct in Yonkers at Summit Street. It is a section that caught the attention of Mercy Professor, Mary Allison Murphy who teaches Exercise Science. The students got plenty of exercise picking up trash in an area that for some reason is abused by those who live in the area. One piece of trash encourages trash and it piles up.

Photo by John and Lynn Salmon
Author: 
DAlden

Congratulations to Riverkeeper Sweep for successfully encouraging so many of us to get outside and improve our waterways and trails on October 17, 2020. The Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct accepted the invitation to participate, having missed our traditional I Love My Park Day in May 2020. We set up three separate sites, restricted registration, wore our masks, and managed our work while socially distancing. We had a very successful event with 39 participants.

Author: 
LWalter

Our group of dedicated member gardeners (Linda, LIndsey, Barbe and Lesley) made good progress cleaning up the grounds and the new Pollinator Garden near the Keeper's House in preparation for next spring.  A sunny day and good weather made it all more enjoyable. Who says that gardening isn't good exercise?

Photo by Daria Gregg
Author: 
DariaGregg

(photos by Daria Gregg and Diane Alden, Videos by Diane Alden)

About five years ago, after participating in Diane Alden’s “I Love My Park” day, I decided to adopt a section of the Old Croton Aqueduct near my home in Ossining.

Diana Aldren pulling garlic mustard
Author: 
DAlden

Now that gardening and individual volunteer work is permitted, five of us decided to continue the work we have done in past years in May for I Love My Park Day to control Garlic mustard on the northern section of the Old Croton Aqueduct Trail. We had to forgo I Love My Park Day but we did not want to give up on our beloved trail.

We donned our masks, spread apart on the trail and proceeded to collect 10 large bags of invasive Garlic mustard for disposal. It had rained, so it was easy to pull.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Inspired by the eighth annual "I Love My Park Day," this video/montage documents the joyful and energetic work that took place on the Old Croton Aqueduct State Historic Park south of the Croton Dam on May 4th 2019.

Over 100 community members volunteered to remove harmful invasive species and replace them with native plants. They also began the restoration of a historic stone retaining wall, cleaned the banks of the Croton River, and improved drainage on the trail.

Author: 
DAlden

This winter and spring the Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct decided to move forward with vine removal by engaging a professional arborist since we determined that we could not rely on volunteers alone to make enough of a difference up and down the trail.  Successful fundraising efforts have fully supported this first initiative!  We obtained permission from the State Parks for Guy Pardee from Suburban Native, LLC to begin removing vines along the trail.  This is a report of what we hope will be the first of many contracts with Guy. 

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

The new Invasives Removal Squad of the Irvington Green Policy Task Force (GPTF) held an event called Thank Nature Day on December 1, 2019. In collaboration with the Hastings Vine Removal Squad, the Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct (Friends), and the NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, two dozen volunteers came out on a chilly day to help remove and prune invasive plants and clean up litter along the Old Croton Aqueduct Trail (OCA), between Main Street and Matthiessen Road.

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