Stewardship

The Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct work to maintain the beauty of the undeveloped trail and the integrity of the entire length of the tunnel from Croton into New York City. We are always looking for volunteers interested in getting involved with adopting a part of the trail for invasive management. We also have an annual cleanup of the trail in Yonkers.

INVASIVE PLANT MANAGEMENT HISTORIC WALL RESTORATIONNATIVE PLANT RESTORATION

Related Blog Entries

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

The problem: Stilt grass is ubiquitous on the Aqueduct trail and in mid-September is currently flowering and will shortly start to set the seeds which will widely disperse onto the trail.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Excerpt from The Rivertowns Enterprise. Readers can access the full story starting on page 5 of the Rivertowns Enterprise e-digital version from their August 13th edition.  They can open a free e-edition account to view the article at Rivertowns Enterprise e-edtion.

By Kris DiLorenzo

Author: 
DAlden

 

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

It was a fashion-forward I Love My Parks Day in North Yonkers. Thirty "models" recently converged on a scenic runway, the Old Croton Aqueduct Trail, for the annual spring show of voguish volunteers, assisted by a hardworking Yonkers crew from the Dept of Public Works.

While "modelling" their best Covid tees and work sweats in a versatile Spring collection, some volunteers handily eradicated nonnative plants and trash. Uprooting over 150 pounds of wild chervil and garlic mustard was easy in new 2021 Special Edition gear!

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

A group of wonderful students from Mercy College  created their own pop-up I Love My Parks Day on May 1st to clean up the trail between Cedar Street in Dobbs Ferry and the Mercy Campus.

Way to go guys and thank you!

Author: 
LWalter

… . Smack in the midst of 200,00 people, on Yonker’s hidden gem!

In late March, arborist Guy Pardee of Suburban Native LLC took up combat along a section of North Yonkers Aqueduct Trail. Guy chops vines for a living - freeing trees, rock walls and scenic views in the process. That’s when he discovered the wildlife. Besides an owl pellet filled with mouse bones, and an osprey, he found a gulch filled with feral cats and large deer families living in backyards.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Yes, there were some!

From March 2020 on, the Keeper’s House was closed. No happy faces enjoying our exhibits.

But the trail is different.

There are more walkers than ever before. We were stunned to do a count of map orders in 2020 compared to 2019. Orders were up an astonishing 93%!! The trail tells the tale. It is looking very well used. And well cared for, too.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

As promised, I recruited individual families to continue the work of removing Garlic mustard from the trail. Two parents and their two little girls enjoyed clambering along the hillsides of the trail pulling Garlic mustard and bagging it for disposal. This family had participated in the 2019 I Love My Park Day and were pleased to have the opportunity to continue the work the following May.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

(photo by Pilar Maschi)

Volunteers from the Friends of Aqueduct Walk and the University Heights community, led by Pilar Maschi, Partnership for Parks Catalyst facilitator, demonstrated their hard work and love for the Aqueduct trail by holding a clean-up event on Saturday, November 8. An article in the Norwood News' November 27 issue noted that the volunteers also planted crocuses. Aqueduct Walk, a New York City park, lies between Fordham Road and 183rd St. in The Bronx.

Congratulations from Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct!

 

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

The Mercy campus is right on the trail in Dobbs Ferry, but on a Saturday in November a group of students went further afield to parts of the Aqueduct where they don’t usually walk.

They assembled at a neglected section of the Aqueduct in Yonkers at Summit Street. It is a section that caught the attention of Mercy Professor, Mary Allison Murphy who teaches Exercise Science. The students got plenty of exercise picking up trash in an area that for some reason is abused by those who live in the area. One piece of trash encourages trash and it piles up.

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