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Author: 
FOCAAdmin

The Mercy campus is right on the trail in Dobbs Ferry, but on a Saturday in November a group of students went further afield to parts of the Aqueduct where they don’t usually walk.

They assembled at a neglected section of the Aqueduct in Yonkers at Summit Street. It is a section that caught the attention of Mercy Professor, Mary Allison Murphy who teaches Exercise Science. The students got plenty of exercise picking up trash in an area that for some reason is abused by those who live in the area. One piece of trash encourages trash and it piles up.

Photo by John and Lynn Salmon
Author: 
DAlden

Congratulations to Riverkeeper Sweep for successfully encouraging so many of us to get outside and improve our waterways and trails on October 17, 2020. The Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct accepted the invitation to participate, having missed our traditional I Love My Park Day in May 2020. We set up three separate sites, restricted registration, wore our masks, and managed our work while socially distancing. We had a very successful event with 39 participants.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

 

A report by patch earner Lloyd Philips (follow him on Instagram! @doubleLp)

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Dionisio Cortes Ortega, a NYS Registered Architect, has created a sculpture entitled Croton Arch of Triumph (Croton Arch of Triumph), which can be found at the Socrates Sculpture Park in Queens, It is a monument to the Old Croton Aqueduct System. In her words, "The inspiration for the sculpture came from a book that Kevin Bone, a professor and architect from The Cooper Union, wrote called Water Works. The book has a great account of the entire NYC water system history.”

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Fall offers us some of New York’s best weather. It is also a fine season to visit the High Bridge, the centerpiece of the original (“Old”) Croton Aqueduct, completed in 1848 and today the city’s oldest bridge. The High Bridge carried pure, plentiful Croton River water — the beginning of the city’s world-famed water supply — from the mainland, across the Harlem River, to Manhattan Island at a time when New York City existed only at the south tip of the island. The water pipes are still there, beneath the bridge’s deck where visitors stroll.

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