Our Blogs

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Inspired by the eighth annual "I Love My Park Day," this video/montage documents the joyful and energetic work that took place on the Old Croton Aqueduct State Historic Park south of the Croton Dam on May 4th 2019.

Over 100 community members volunteered to remove harmful invasive species and replace them with native plants. They also began the restoration of a historic stone retaining wall, cleaned the banks of the Croton River, and improved drainage on the trail.

Author: 
DAlden

This winter and spring the Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct decided to move forward with vine removal by engaging a professional arborist since we determined that we could not rely on volunteers alone to make enough of a difference up and down the trail.  Successful fundraising efforts have fully supported this first initiative!  We obtained permission from the State Parks for Guy Pardee from Suburban Native, LLC to begin removing vines along the trail.  This is a report of what we hope will be the first of many contracts with Guy. 

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Hello all: we would like to keep the Aqueduct trail park open, but this can only happen with your cooperation. Please observe social distancing rules, or the Park may have to close as has been done in New Jersey.

 

 

Photo by Janko Ferlič at Unsplash
Author: 
FOCAAdmin

 

We regret to announce that the Old Croton Aqueduct Keepers House will be closed until further notice.  But don't forget the Trail is always open! 

(Courtesy of our Friends at Teatown in Ossining)

With children staying home from school in the coming weeks, we wanted to share some family-friendly outdoor activities with our community as we practice social distancing:

Before and after reclamation of the Old Croton Aqueduct trail in Tarrytown
Author: 
Charlotte Fahn

A parking lot that for more than 50 years has blighted a section of the Old Croton Aqueduct trail in Tarrytown is no more. Thanks to State Parks and the Village of Tarrytown, the parking lot - roughly paved, usually unkempt, and often full – has been replaced by a pristine swath of green, with a delineated path and new plantings.

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