Education

The Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct educate the public about the history or the tunnel and trail.

SCHOOL TOURS LECTURES, WALKS AND TOURS

Please find below some of our educational content.

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Bob Kornfeld describing early drawings
Author: 
FOCAAdmin

The opening reception for the The Tunnel: A Passage Through History a

Cross-section of tunnel architectural drawing
Author: 
FOCAAdmin

The Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct present an important new exhibit at the Keeper’s House. 

THE TUNNEL: A PASSAGE THROUGH HISTORY

It answers  the question, “ How did the engineering miracle of the Aqueduct actually happen 175 years ago?”

Early engineering drawings and plans and how they evolved  will be highlighted and explained by Architect/engineer, Robert Kornfeld at  the opening reception on December 16, 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM.

Invasive vines
Author: 
FOCAAdmin

On July 15 the Friends participated in New York State’s Invasive Species Awareness Week by hosting a workshop on Invasive Species at the Keeper’s House.   Workshop leaders Diane Alden and Daria Gregg have participated in surveying the entire Westchester section of the Aqueduct trail, are Wildflower Guides at Teatown and have adopted sections of the Aqueduct near their homes where they have been working for many years to control invasive plants and to do restoration planting with native species.  Diane is an amateur naturalist and Daria is a Citizen Scientist at the NY Botanic

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

On Sunday afternoon, June 3rd, Cornelia Cotton, long time member of the Friends shared with a standing room only audience her own perspective of the story of the Old Croton Aqueduct.  

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct stalwarts Mavis Cain, Eddie Jabbour, Michael Ambrozek and Angelica Campoverde braved a chill, drizzly day to represent the Friends at the May 12 “Highbridge Rocks Community Festival” in Manhattan's Highbridge Park, organized by NYC Parks & Recreation. Our contingent took turns introducing local residents to the Aqueduct story at the Friends' table or leading walks on the High Bridge and the area near the fabled Coogan's Bluff. Many local residents were totally unaware of the Aqueduct trail and its link with the bridge.

Author: 
HubertHerring

Before a packed crowd at the Friends’ annual meeting on April 29, Adam Bosch, a spokesman for the New York City DEP and

Author: 
DaveBaldwin

With the completion of the Croton Reservoir and Aqueduct in 1842 the City of New York held what had been called the largest celebration in its history. Part of that celebration included the presentation of silver medals, engraved and struck by New York City medalist Robert Lovett Sr., to individuals involved in the project and the celebration. Exactly how many were awarded is not known but they were awarded to the 17 Alderman as well as other dignitaries. And how many still exist is unknown as they appear very rarely in the numismatic marketplace.

Author: 
joannariesman

On Sunday, October 8, the Friends hosted a party on the lawns of the Keeper's House to commemorate the October day 175 years ago when Croton water first arrived in New York City.  The rain stopped on cue, and we were able to celebrate the flow of water without any flowing over us. 

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

A lovely Spring day was had by all. Some of us went on to Dia Beacon, while others came early for breakfast on Main Street before the boat ride to sunny Pollopel Island. A band of docents shepherded us through the ruins and showed off old photos of the castle home and arsenal. This was a wonderful way to get to know more about our group .... it turned out that 3 participants knew each other from high school. And Jane Reed's description of Dobbs Ferry 54 years ago was a stitch!

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

SUNDAY APRIL 23, 2PM

The story of Burr’s maneuverings to found a bank (now JP Morgan Chase) by pretending to meet New York City’s urgent need for clean water is one of the more colorful sidebars of our water supply history. In this 175th anniversary year of the Old Croton Aqueduct, learn how Burr pulled it off, Alexander Hamilton’s ambiguous role, and the consequences of Burr’s ruse for the emerging metropolis.

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