FOCAAdmin's blog

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

THE FRIENDS OF THE OLD CROTON AQUEDUCT ARE PLEASED TO HAVE BEEN INVOLVED IN THIS HISTORIC EVENT.

After being closed for 45 years, the Old Croton Aqueduct’s High Bridge, now renovated, is open to the public. The bridge is part of New York City’s park system, administered by the city’s Department of Parks & Recreation. It is accessible to all, including visitors using wheelchairs, bikes, and strollers. Following are directions for getting onto the bridge from both the Bronx and Manhattan ends.

The Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct were founding members of the Steering Committee of the High Bridge Coalition, formed in 2001, and have remained active for its entire duration. The Coalition Steering Committee, with support from the Parks Department and Partnership for Parks, recruited member organizations - eventually about 50 - and individual members who together championed the plan to reopen the bridge.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

photo from NYCWater's Flickr account

A new chapter opened in the long history of the New Croton Aqueduct with the May 8 announcement by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection that it is once again providing water to the city. The 33-mile-long New Croton opened in 1890. It is three times larger than the Old Croton and lies further east and deeper underground. Generally providing about 10% of the water supply, it can provide up to about a third when the need arises.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

A new pedestrian bridge connecting the Shandler Recreation Area and Croton Woods in Van Cortlandt Park will reconnect two large parts of the park that were cut apart by the 1950s construction of the Major Deegan Expressway. The bridge, if not directly on the Old Croton Aqueduct, will be so close to it that in effect it will also reconnect the trail, eliminating the detour to 233rd St. that has bedeviled Aqueduct walkers for decades.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

FOR OUR PHOTO ALBUM OF THE EVENT CLICK HERE.

The Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct congratulate and thank the 60 volunteers, community co-sponsors and corporate donors who worked together along with the Aqueduct State Park crew on May 2nd to make the fourth annual I Love My Park Day on the Old Croton Aqueduct trail outstanding, productive and very enjoyable neighborhood events.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Join Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct to


Lop Vines
Remove Invasive Plants & Bushes
Learn invasive plant ID & pruning/removal techniques
Restore with native plants

Register in advance at www.ptny.org/ilovemypark
Walk-ins also welcome

As part of the fourth annual New York State-wide I Love My Park Day, the Friends are hosting an Old Croton Aqueduct Trail improvement day in both northern and southern locations along the Aqueduct. These events are being held in collaboration with the NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and Parks & Trails NY. Volunteers will have the opportunity to learn to identify and remove invasive species along the trail, to pick up trash and to enjoy the camaraderie of friends and neighbors.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

300 people at the event, 13.5 tons of garbage/debris picked up that day.
now, the clean-up zone for the day was only 3/8 of a mile long, so that gives you an idea of the extent of the problem.

Check out our PHOTO ALBUM of last week's Cleanup of the Trail in Yonkers.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

We’re hoping for a big turnout of volunteers, like our wonderful group from last year. It’s satisfying and fun, See you there!

Join Mayor Mike Spano and local volunteers in beautifying our section of the Old Croton Aqueduct Trail.

Please pre-register by emailing laura.boatswain@yonkersny.gov or by calling (914) 377-6429. Volunteers may also sign up at the event.

WHEN - Saturday April 18

9:30 AM Registration – Parks Department
285 Nepperhan Avenue
9:45 AM – Press Conference
10:00 AM – 2:00 PM Clean-up Aqueduct

WHERE

Meet outside Parks Department; Parking available behind Parks Administrative Building
Event will take place Rain or Shine
Transportation will be available to bring volunteers to clean-up sites along the Old Croton Aqueduct trail.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Please attend our Annual Meeting on Sunday, April 12 at 2pm.

The relationship of large cities to the natural world is a mass of contradictions. Cities replace habitats with manmade structures of steel and concrete and consume vast amounts of resources from far beyond their
limits. Ironically, cities also represent the last best hope for conserving healthy remnants of the world’s species and ecosystems, and play a crucial role in combating environmental destruction elsewhere.

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

Left to right: Steven Oakes, Historic Site Manager; Tony Failla and Jeff Litwinowicz. Photo: Linda Cooper

These are our three trail heroes who not only patrol and protect and solve problems on all 26 miles of the trail, they do it with a smile – and an occasional growl from Tony for any careless behavior on the trial by outsiders. If you pay a visit to the barn in the summer you might be given a prize tomato or maybe even a squash offered by Tony who keeps a garden at the trailer. If you come by the barn at lunch time in the winter, often the three guys are enjoying each other’s company over a sandwich.

Tony's moments of power are when he is running the chipper and grinding up huge pieces of wood while warning volunteers to keep away from the wood-eating monster... Jeff is loved by all Aqueduct kids because he joshes them and has a big smile behind the beard. Mavis’ grandson always asks before an event, “ Will Jeff be there?”

Author: 
FOCAAdmin

photo: Oliver Lednicer

Cross-country skiing and snow shoeing are suddenly popular. A few years ago, walkers who saw me on my skis used to ask “ Where do you get skis like that?” Now the tracks on the trail are already formed when I get out on an afternoon. Snow-shoe tracks are even more prevalent sometimes breaking up the smoother ski tracks.

Some sections of the trail are better than others. My recommendations are: Park your car at Gorey Brook road in Sleepy Hollow. Here there’s an easy entrance to the trail where it runs parallel to the Rockefeller Preserve. Skiers who don’t like hills should stay on the Aqueduct for a smooth tranquil run past the Sleepy Hollow Weir Chamber and north to the bridge over the highway. Those who like hills should enter the Rockefeller Preserve just north of the Weir chamber and follow Peggy’s Way south for some gentle hills before returning to the Aqueduct.

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